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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
mean, a real movement like the labor movement or the anti-war movement on the civil right movement. a bunch of college kids waiving signs. we have to woo have a real movement that connects with people in their every day lives. that's the only way our side wins. thank you very much. >> wait. wait! we have time for one more question. >> you mentioned the power of money it is in churches very suspicious of the fundamentalist schurnlgs they say god wants you to be rich. that is for a part of the problem is. -- i have a needle. come on. >> guys? as a political junkie, i love reading the book. go out there and go to the book signing. buy it. thank you very much. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >>> in a couple of minutes we'll be back with more live coverage of the texas book festival. a panel on education reform is next. here's a look at upcoming book fairs and festivals. this weekend booktv is live from a texas book festival. it includes present tastes by many people. visit booktv.org for complete schedule of the events. >>> national press club book fair a
of faith understand this isn't about any one religious belief. it's about protecting the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. i'm drinkin' a dunkin' latte. i'm in love with my dunkin' latte. it is a treat. they're packed with flavor. it's my kind of latte. try the simply delicious latte everyone can enjoy. america runs on dunkin'! >>> i just separated jim and peter, everything okay. >> yes, calm them down. >> it's close now and -- >> i know. right around the corner. >> less than a week to go. >>> tucker is here with the weather. guess what's going on this weekend? >> what is? >> extra hour to snooze. >> oh, yay! i had forgotten all about it. >> bad news is it will be getting dark at, you know -- >> like at 5:30. >> no, even earlier than that. 4:45. >> what? >> we're going to lose and hour of daylight on the back end of it. >> really early. >> i'll let you know when the sun is going to set sunday but i think it's about 5:15. going to be an educated guess. let me mention the storm, still some sho
in this issue. >> bloomberg called gay marriage a civil rights issue and talked about the economic impact of the marriage equality law in new york, pointing out that more than 8,000 gay and lesbian couple couples have been married in new york city since may of last year. >> we've calculated that same-sex marriage has generated more than $259 million in economic activity in our city. >> the latest polling numbers show a majority of voters in the state support marriage equality. if passed, maryland would be the first state to pass marriage equality at the ballot box. >> i firmly believe the question we face is not if marriage equality will come to all 50 states but simply when and marylanders have a chance to lead the way on election day. >> in baltimore, kai reed, wbal-tv 11 news. >> this election, maryland voters will choose a president and decipher through seven referendum questions, a task that can be challenging but our smartphone app makes the process so much easier. the power of wbal-tv 11's commitment 2012 coverage is at your fingertips. follow live updates from live wires as we cou
push. and they have been out there at the polls. the other thing is those civil rights groups and those groups dedicated to fighting voter suppression have been really campaigning to get people to the polls early and take advantage of early voting. especially in those states where those voter i.d. laws could be a sticking point. they want to give those people a chance in case there is a snag, a hiccup, they can still have time to get to the polls november 6th. >> and in case they don't know, 6 and 7, we're talking about same-sex marriage and we're talking about expanding gambling in prince george's county. >> yeah, two big, big contentious issues. two issues that both sides, the fors and against, have spent a ton of money, a ton of money, record-setting amounts of money, manpower, and so on. and so these issues really are driving people. people want to take their time in the booths. and so that's contributing to the long line as well as just the turnout. >> a lot to get through on those ballots. how about the district? what's going on in d.c.? because we're seeing long lines here too. >
right on par with civil rights of the 1960's. let's end the drug wars. legalize marijuana now. [applause] let's repeal the patriot act. [cheers and applause] i would have never signed the national defense authorization act allowing for you and i as u.s. citizens to be arrested and detained without being charged. that's the reason we fought wars in this country. [cheers and applause] i promise to submit a balanced budget to congress in the year 2013. that is a 1.4 trillion reduction in federal spending. if we don't do this now, we are going to find ourselves in a monetary collapse and a monetary collapse very simply is when the dollars we have in our pockets don't buy a thing because of the acome anying inflation -- because of the accompanying inflation that goes along with every dollar we spend. thathe only candidate wants to eliminate income tax, eliminate corporate tax, abolish the i.r.s. and replace all of that with one federal consumption tax, the fair tax. i think it is the answer to our exports, it is the answer to american jobs. [applause] >> in what way way does the war on drugs
any one religious belief. it's about protecting the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. >>> here's your seven-day forecast. rain continues this afternoon. it will become lighter as the day wears on as will the winds which were still gusty this morning. and then later this afternoon winds 20 to 30. hang in there. halloween looks a little brighter, temperatures in the mid-50s and some sunshine to end the week, so we'll get a chance to dry out and clean up over much of the seven days as it looks nice and quiet. >> lauren demarco called in from ocean city to let us know 17th down to inlet, is that what's closed, katie? yeah. that's still closed, but 62nd to 17th is now reopened. so you can go back and check out your businesses and the like. >> ocean city. >> that's in ocean city, >> that's some good news.
. rosa parks took the upper seat in montgomery, alabama. it did not create the civil- rights movement. it was a courageous act, but public opinion had changed before that. and the reason we know that public opinion change first is because rosa parks did the same thing 12 years earlier and nothing happened. in between, african-american soldiers came back from world war ii, southerners came back north with a different set of views, but jackie robinson began to play major-league baseball. the political process caught up later and it took a catalyst to spark the change. right now we are in one of those moments where public opinion is ahead of the political leadership. >> importantly, what rick says about people walking into thoughts and ideologies is true, but on the other hand every poll shows that people want our elected officials to compromise and get things done. that is the message. >> i am accompanying ed miller, from texas. karl rove is single-handedly responsible for turning my mother into an armchair pollster. every other day she calls up and says -- french, obama is up by three.
with opposing the war in chicago, very much part of our civil rights movement. chicago was the most segregated city in the country at the time. baltimore, maryland, was the second. and what concerned us, and we felt that we had read a lot about the history, the treatment, the poor treatment of the french toward the vietnamese, we were funding that war. in the 1950s. france as well. and, do you have any comments on our use of agent orange against the country that, as far as we could find, hadn't done anything to anybody? and were there any observations you came across on the 1968 democratic convention, and do you see any hope for this country learning something rather than perpetuating -- i did meet soldiers who said they saw shell oil trucks crossing the front lines into north vietnam. i don't know whether you came across any ties to the oil industry. as part of this. thank you. >> in terms of agent orange, i didn't actually run across much of that in terms of what i saw of the documents in the united states. it's one of these issues -- i mean, if i were alive in vietnam, i would have opposed
with civil rights. grant was the last of the lincoln republicans. one point i make is grant was the last president, the only president between abraham lincoln and lyndon johnson who took civil-rights for african-americans seriously. after grant left office the former slaves were left to the tender mercies of the majority of the south and quickly they were shoved to the side. >> don't ask the question if you don't want bill to answer it thoroughly. >> i do accept yes and no, multiple choice questions. >> we only have three minutes and there's a serious deadline so a brief question. >> you said you want to write history or biography. when i read your benjamin franklin biography you sound like a particle american, the first to the modern in some sense. very different people speaking. , who is the first american in the sense that he or she has attitudes like we do and writing biographies and things like that between 1620, and 1770. >> i am not sure i understand the question. who is the first american? >> who would you think after early colonization would have american attitudes that we recog
's political activities from a fairly young age. >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's conven
civil rights were worth fighng for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) san fransco as the repubn aron party nvenes tnomina i choice for president >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt trav with hidedad watch him take on consvaveatat republan senat barry ldwa >> the rublican y sh unuivoy repudiat trem of thght and , and the eorts infate or a ehh selves tr pay its candidates. >> mit absorbing all o sees his fa basical taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barrys goldwater's convention. >> i would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. (cwd cheers) >> nrator: and when water received the nomination, mitt saw his father angrily storm out. >> i think that my father was
that government has certain basic responsibilities by guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame respect over division hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and his integrity but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see. like the connection between little civility and hungry children. that vision became good for peace and a mcgovern dole international food education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962 he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on vietnam. in 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels and in 1984 he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, the challenges and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america will be a better place had george become
for themselves and what straight couples have right now. host: so why not civil unions? >> it's a very different institution, it is a second class institution. civil unions are ok in some states. they were definitely part of the journey towards marriage. i have a great deal of respect for the states that passed those. but unfortunately the word marriage is the only word that is recognized in federal law approximately 1300 times. so when it comes down to protecting our families it is really only the institution of marriage the right to marry that will give us those protections. i will tell you we are on a journey here as americans continuously on a number of different issues. so we have to understand that we are looking to be treated as equal in the eyes of the law and equal in terms of the common human bonds that we share with all americans. and it is really only marriage that gets you that equal standing with my straight brother and sister. host: so what protections would be different under a marriage than civil unions? >> right now the federal government has a law in place called the defensive
guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame. respect over division. hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and integrity, but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see, like, the connection between political stability and hungry children. that vision became food for peace. and the mcgovern-adult education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962, he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on the non. -- vietname. -- vietnam. 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels. in 1984, he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, challenges, and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america would be a better place had george become president of the united states. [applause] that does not mean his campaign was a failure. far from it. the 1972 campaign open
but i do believe everyone is entitled to rights and that's why i support civil unions. >> moderator: next question to the kingman. >> this keep in via e-mail. how would you restructure the taxes? >> i talked about the need to make our code more simple and fair. we have way to many loopholes taken advantage of because it's school in they have lawyers that find these loopholes. that doesn't mean it's right. even if it's legal, we should change that because it's not helping create jobs. every day i meet with small business owners, and those guys, a lot of them just -- they come fresh from their work. they have oil on them and grease, and they can't afford to hire a whole wing of lawyers to find these loopholes? that's an example. and by the way, jets and oil companies and loopholes that allow companies to write off moving jobs overseas, those are primed to be closed. that helps our small businesses. we can lower rates for our guys and gals and hard-working families. so what i'm for is making sure we execute this process. i have voted to stepped -- extend out the current rates for a yea
of reality, i think african-americans and most people in modern civilization have a long ways to go before they perceive reality in the right way that will permit them to have the kind of brotherhood that we all hope for in these great religions of christianity, judaism, islam, etc. before we can have that real brotherhood, that feeling of love for my fellow human being, i think we have to grow up and mature a lot when it comes to perceiving the realities that we think we know already, you know. i'm talking about our nation. the way i perceive our nation, i think, is very healthy for me, and i wish all african-americans could perceive this america the way i perceive it, but they don't. and the many white americans that i have become acquainted with perceive this nation as not the way that i think would give me a good life and my children a good life if i passed those feelings on to my children. so american people, in my opinion- and not only the way we perceive america, the way we look at human beings, too, human life and everything, i think we are a society of people that are far advanced
culpable. remember the civil stuff he saw in arizona. is that civil? for those of you keeping score, there is certainly craziness on the right. we all know that the far right did not have much clout in tamp, hardly any at the republic convention. there is a vast difference in presentation between the g.o.p. and the dems. the election referendum on barack obama. do you want his liberal governance or not? if you do want it, then you have to accept the far left loons that come along with it. that's the memo. now for the top story tonight. how is the vote shaping one six days to go. joining us now from austin, texas. fox news analyst carl rove. mr. rove, new "new york times" poll out today shows president obama doing very well in florida, ohio, virginia. dick morris going to have thoughts on that later. but, do you take that poll seriously? >> no, i don't take those three polls seriously. here is why. in florida, they have obama ahead by 1 point. they have seven points more democrats than republicans. even in 2008 there were only 3 points more democrats than republicans. similarly ohio
insider rights this a -- guest: the civil union issue, i think that is accurate, by the way. i have not see the civil union issue pop up in to the contras as of the average voter. on the margins, -- into the consciousness of the average voter. on the margins, it may pop up. although, it would traditionally break into the democratic party since they have been the sponsor of this type of legislation in the legislature. the predominant issue around the country is the economy. host: the bloomberg insider also reports -- guest: can we do a better job, absolutely. and we must do a better job for one to remain a relevant party on the national scene, and particularly in the west. the latino vote, the hispanic vote as we like to call that in the west, it had shifted toward the republicans under president and former colorado gov. bill once actually won the hispanic vote here in 2002. it began to slip away. we had some issues with one of our congressman, congressman tom tancredo pushed away some of those votes. of the active voting provision is about 16%. the -- the acting voting population is
happened. is that right? and if it's not right, please explain. are the afghans involved? civil society involved? how does that -- give us a little bit of insight into how one of those investigations -- >> let me start and then doug can give the ground sense of this. whenever there is a sieve yang casual -- civilian casualty, there is a jointly-led investigation with afghans. it is taken extremely seriously to get to the truth of this. >> and, of course, on some occasions it's difficult to do that because of the nature of the, of the incident. this is jointly delivered, and it is recorded as such. >> thank you very much. the joint investigation team would be led by an officer who comes from the southwest with his partner, an afghan, and from the provincial side of it calling in members of the afghan security forces as required and then members of the district government as well. so it goes on over a period of time. there's been an initial visit by that team, and there have also been other areas in order to collect other pieces of evidence to make their understanding whole, and they woul
the civil war. >> you're rolling your eyes, george. >> am i wrong? >> you are and i'll say why. democrats have been losing the white vote constantly since 1964. >> john kerry lost the white vote. >> that's right. 20008, from obama, gets that many white votes. we're trying to explain this difference. now, two possible explanations lot of white people who voted for obama in 2008 watched him govern for four years and said, not so good, let's try someone else. the con fedry theory, in the last four years, became racist. >> that's not my argument at all, george. >> it sounds like it. >> no. i'm pointing out the fact that the white voters changing their minds happen to be in virginia and florida. only two states in the -- let me point out -- southernization of the republican party. they were the only two states in 2008 that violated the rule. >> a statement that's checkable and false. that people -- white people moving away are in those two states. >> and a loft them were republicans. >> look, one more time, this could be ohio, that's where president obama is focusing on, the white male vote in
doesn't make sense. charles: the notion of a more civil tone within the discourse could be the overarching message. >> it is a funny start. charles: you're right about kid rock saying a lot of things the majority of americans, but i would not put the deer on the front. that was weird. the highlight reel is next. charles: we have some breaking news. think about this. the labor department saying they have not made a decision on whether to delay friday's jobs report. that is huge. the next number will be revised higher. there is no way that number was real. what if all this economic data is pushed past the election. >> that is exceedingly rare for the labor department to delay or even discussed delaying it. talking about how hurricane sandy may lower gdp which is already getting along at 2%. we could go into negative territory. they are saying sizable negative impact from hurricane sandy. watch out for that. >> plus, what this could do to consumer confidence. the confidence index, this could really affect it. playing with this politically, bad for the obama administration.
to be on health benefits. and i believe civil unions should be acceptable so they should have these rights. but this is between a man and woman. i believe two people that want to make that commitment it should be marriage. that's why the human rights campaign gave me their endorsement >> do you think it's a moderate district? >> it is a moderate district. i think it's more fiscally conservative and socially moderate. . >> i know the majority of my district supports marriage quality and employment non-discrimination act yet mr. dole opposes that. >> let's go to another question and the question is for mr. insider. >> why vnlt you released your tax return? >> the voters want to know what i've owned even our kids savings accounts are included with the report i filed. >> what do you pay in terms of tax rates? >> that's been reported in the papers as well. my wife has her own career. she has employees and clients and competitors. she's not running for congress. i believe my wife has a certain degree of privacy. everything voters want to know about my finances is in the report. >> they're entitl
to the civil rights act. >> this conversation is taking a nasty turn since i found out i got my tac -- facts wrong. [laughter] >> you know, you got so many other facts right in your book, i don't think you need to worry. i would like you each to talk a little bit, starting with you, marc, about the different facets and aspects of the personalities to which you were privy, in particular in your case lbj and some of the dynamics and contradictions in lbj is personality as reflected by the many voices that you have included in this book. >> well, i'm looking at in the audience. many technology to people, one of whom is harry middleton. terry was the first director of the lbj library, my predecessor, my dear friend, and so much of the scholarship about ladybird johnson comes from the work that harry did in the lbj library. the other one sitting next to him is surely a chance to work for mrs. johnson for many years into recently prevailed with the united states post office in getting a postage stamp in honors of ladybird johnson. [applause] a friend of mine and harry's ensure lease was a speechwr
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)